Therapy group activities to write an eulogy

I was with a group of people at a nice Japanese restaurant called Katana. I heard brakes screeching and the crunching sound of metal on metal. Next thing I know, everyone in the restaurant was jumping out of their seats and running toward the street to see what happened.

Therapy group activities to write an eulogy

About the Write Your Own Eulogy Exercise This exercise is one of the most challenging and powerful emotional activities I know, so be careful about the group and situation in which you choose to use it. My suggestion is that it will tend to work better in the middle or latter stages of a program.

Group Activities - Expressive Therapist

For a short session, allow approx. For a longer session, perhaps involving sharing eulogies, allow approx. As a lead-up or extension, this exercise could be combined with exploring one's mortality via online activities such as www.

This nature of this exercise and the way it is presented can lead to some participants feeling 'too confronted'. In these situations I've taken the pressure off everyone writing a eulogy and instead had a group discussion about whether or not people ever think about dying, if not why not, and if they do, what do they think about the reality that one day, today will be the last day of their life!

Applications of the Write Your Own Eulogy Exercise This exercise is designed for young adults, but could be adapted for children, adolescents and older adults. Examples of possible applications of the Write Your Own Eulogy are: Cautions This is an activity that one must consider carefully with groups where death and grief are likely significant issues.

Facilitators must be ready to address and deal with grief and loss reactions as well as post traumatic stress responses.

therapy group activities to write an eulogy

Be prepared for a wide variety of reactions, many if not of all of which could be viewed as defence mechanisms for dealing with unsolved "death anxiety" or "existential angst". Common reactions I've found include: Unless one has a legitimate therapeutic intention, I tend to avoid trying to engage these reactions.

The Therapist Within

I tend to offer gentle, general suggestions about why it might be an interesting exercise. I also explain that it may be illustrating some validity of the existential perspective that we do not find it easier to confront our mortality.

At the very least, I find the exercise provokes interesting conversation about existentialism and its relation to psychology and themselves, even if not many eulogies are written.

One need also be aware that for individuals who have encountered traumatic experiences of death, particularly recent unsolved deaths, the exercise may provoke quite raw reactions. Outline - Write Your Own Eulogy Ask participants to imagine that they died today and for each of them to write a eulogy that they would like to have read out at their own funeral.

Give participants a chance to go and sit alone and write their eulogy. Or just stay simple and let them make of the activity whatever they will. When the group comes back together you could discuss what it was like to think and write about their life and death.

Life Map - help people get their life in perspective by mapping out the past and the future Existential Perspectives on Personality - some people theorize that the way we think about life and death characterizes the human psyche and personality.It's meant for the select group of people who knew and cared for that person, or who care for the survivors." "It's the personal touch," says Garry Schaeffer, author of A Labor of Love: How to Write a Eulogy.

Write Your Own Eulogy - A Psychological Exercise. Write Your Own Eulogy - A Psychological Exercise from Pinterest. EDITABLE Growth Mindset Posters (w/Student Printables) Social Work Activities Group activities Therapy activities Coping Skills Activities Therapy.

therapy group activities to write an eulogy

About the Write Your Own Eulogy Exercise. This exercise is one of the most challenging and powerful emotional activities I know, so be careful about the group and situation in which you choose to use it. Feeling Code Collage (learned from my art therapy supervisor, Susan LaMantia) Take one sheet of paper and draw and color an image to represent various feelings, such as happy, sad, mad, scared, embarrassment, love, peace, crazy, bored, etc.

Label each image with the feeling. Write your birth year at the left end of the line and the current year at the right end. If you are worried about having enough space for your timeline (not that you’re old!), .

Write Your Own Eulogy. Explore personal meanings of life and death; can alter perspective (reveals big picture), but is confronting. Do the activity in a graveyard or church for added effect. Group Mandala: A projective, group dynamics exercise.

Each person is represented by an object.

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